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English

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Course Structure: MA English and Cultural Studies

SYLLABUS FOR MA English & Cultural Studies [pdf] NEW

CBCS ENGLISH COURSE I (305): DYNAMICS OF ENGLISH STUDIES (CBCS)

 


THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES

MANIPUR UNIVERSITY

MODIFIED SYLLABUS (w.e.f. 2019-20)

 

This is the revised syllabus for M.A. Programme in the Department of English (now to be renamed The Department of English and Cultural Studies) which is comprised of sixteen Courses in four Semesters, each Semester having four Courses. Each Course has four credits and shall carry 100 marks of which the first 30 marks are reserved for internal evaluation through three examination methods. They are:

(1) Internal Assessment Test: 10 marks

(2) Home Assignment: 10 marks

(3) Viva Voce Test: 10 marks

At the end of each Semester an end Semester Examination carrying 70 marks shall be conducted. The marks secured by the students shall be converted to the Grade System, as framed by the University. The duration of the examination is 3 hours. Each semester shall have 90 working days. The Courses are designed as follows.

The Department has newly introduced a Field Trip, as part of the Curriculum from the next academic session 2019-20, once a year, as resolved in a meeting of the Board of the Studies of the Department (BSD) held on 13 June 2019.

As the University has adopted Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) students of the 3 rd and the 4 th Semesters have to choose one Course each in other disciplines compulsorily from this year 2019-20 in addition to their normal Courses.

 

FIRST SEMESTER

COURSE NO. TITLE OF COURSE NUMBER OF CREDITS

101 British Poetry – 1 4

102 British Drama – 1 4

103 British Fiction – 1 4

104 Introduction to Linguistics 4

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 101: BRITISH POETRY - I

Background Lectures: Devoted to different Ages/Periods of the poems prescribed.

The poems and authors prescribed:

Unknown writer Pearl

Geoffrey Chaucer Prologue to the Canterbury Tales

William Shakespeare Sonnets: (18) “Shall I Compare Thee...”; (73) “That Time of the Year ...”; (116) “Let Me Not to the Marriage....”

John Donne “The Sunne Rising”; “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning”; “The Exstasie”

William Wordsworth “Tintern Abbey”; “Solitary Reaper”; “Daffodils”

S.T. Coleridge “The Rime of Ancient Mariner”

John Keats “Ode to a Nightingale; Ode on a Grecian Urn”

Alexander Pope The Rape of the Lock

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 102: BRITISH DRAMA – I

Background Lectures on: Tragedy and Comedy.

William Shakespeare King Lear

Measure for Measure

John Webster Duchess of Malfi

Christopher Marlowe Dr Faustus

William Congreve The Way of the World

Ben Johnson The Alchemist

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 103: BRITISH FICTION – I

Background Lectures on: The Rise of the Novel, (The 18 th and the 19 th Century Novel)2

Aphra Behn Oroonoko

Henry Fielding Tom Jones

Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice

Charles Dickens Great Expectations

Thomas Hardy The Mayor of Casterbridge

Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 104: INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS

Language: definition; properties of language; characteristics of language; human and non-human system of communication.

Linguistic as the scientific study of language: prescriptive and descriptive approaches; synchrony and diachrony; langue and parole; competence and performance; idiolect; dialect; linguistic analysis – paradigmatic; syntagmatic; structural; functional; etic; emic; linguistic and related disciplines.

Phonology: concept of phoneme; phone and allophone; different types of sounds; vowels and consonants; classifications of vowels and consonants.

Morphology: concept of morpheme; morph and allomorph; affixes; inflectional and derivation and morphophonemic change.

Syntax: clauses and phrases; types of clauses; types of sentences – structural and functional; coordinating; word order; complementation.

Suggested Reading

1. A.C. Gimson (1980): An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English.

2. D. Bolinger (1968): Aspects of Language.

3. F.D. Saussure (1964): A Course in General Linguistics.

4. F.P. Dinnen (1967): An Introduction to General Linguistics.

5. G.M. Simson (1979): A First Course in Linguistics.

6. J. D. O’Connor (1973): Phonetics.

7. C.F. Hockett (1963): A Course in Modern Linguistics.

8. David Crystal (1972): Linguistics.

9. John Lyons (1968): Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics.

10. _________ (1981): Language and Linguistics: An Introduction.

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE NO. TITLE OF COURSE NUMBER OF CREDITS

201 British Poetry – II 4

202 British Drama – II 4

203 Literary Criticism 4

204 Cultural Studies and Folklore 4

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 201: BRITISH POETRY - II

Background Lectures on: Victorian and Modern Poetry

Robert Browning “The Last Ride Together”; “My Last Duchess”

Lord Tennyson “Ulysses”; “The Lotos Eaters”3

Matthew Arnold “The Scholar Gypsy”; “Dover Beach”

W.B. Yeats “The Second Coming”; “Sailing to Byzantium; Byzantium”

T.S. Eliot “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”; “Preludes”

Ezra Pound “The Tree”; “The Return”; “Metro”

Ted Hughes “Hawk Roosting”; “The Thought Fox”; “Childish Prank”

Philip Larkin “Mr Bleaney”; “An Arundel Tomb”; “Toad”

 

COURSE NO: ENG.- 202: BRITISH DRAMA - II

Background Lectures on: 20 th Century Drama (Poetic/Absurd), Irish Dramatic Movement.

J.M. Synge The Riders to the Sea

T.S. Eliot Murder in the Cathedral

Samuel Beckett Waiting for Godot

G.B. Shaw Candida

John Galsworthy Justice

John Osborne Look Back in Anger

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 203: LITERARY CRITICISM

Aristotle Poetics

Bharata Muni Natya Sastra

William Wordsworth “Preface to Lyrical Ballads”

S.T. Coleridge “Fancy & Imagination”

Virginia Woolf “Modern Fiction”

T.S. Eliot “Tradition and Individual Talent”

Practical Criticism

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 204: CULTURAL STUDIES AND FOLKLORE

1. What is Cultural Studies vis-à-vis Popular Culture/Mass Culture?

2. Concepts of Folk, Folklore and Folklife

3. Folklore and Folklife Studies

i. Oral Literature

ii. Material Culture

iii. Social Folk Customs

iv. Performing Folk Arts

4. Functions of Folklore

5. Folklore and Literature

 

Books recommended:

Alan Dundes. The Study of Folklore. London: Prentice-Hall, 1965

Alan Dundes. Interpreting Folklore. Bloomington: Indiana University, 1980

Richard M. Dorson.Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction. Chicago: The Univ. of CP, 1972

Jawaharlal Handoo. Folklore: An Introduction. Mysore: CIIL, 1989

William R. Bascom. Contributions to Foloristics. Meerut: Archana Publications, 19814

 

THIRD SEMESTER

COURSE NO. TITLE OF COURSE NUMBER OF CREDITS

301 British Fiction – II 4

302 American Literature – I 4

303 Indian English Literature 4

304 Epic Traditions of the World 4

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 301: BRITISH FICTION - II

Background Lectures on: 20 th Century Novel.

D.H. Lawrence Sons and Lovers

E.M. Forster A Passage to India

Virginia Woolf To the Lighthouse

George Orwell Animal Farm

Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness

Angela Carter The Bloody Chamber (Some selected pieces)

 

COURSE NO: ENG.- 302: AMERICAN LITERATURE - I

Background Lectures on: American dream and experience; American West/Frontier Experience; American South and What makes American literature American?

Edgar Allan Poe “To Helen”; “The Raven”; “Ulalume”

Walt Whitman “Crossing the Brooklyn Ferry”; “Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking”

Emily Dickinson “A Bird Came Down the Walk”; “My life closed Twice Before its close”; “My Soul Selects her own Society”; “Because I could not stop for Death”

Robert Frost “Mending Wall”; “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening”; “Provide, Provide”

Langston Hughes “Dream Deferred”; “I, too, sing America”

Allen Ginsberg “America”

Maya Angelou “Beloved”; “Caged Bird”; “Still I Rise”

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 303: INDIAN ENGLISH LITERATURE

Background Lectures on: Colonialism and Nationalism; The Rise of Indian English Literature.

Rabindranath Tagore From Gitanjali: “Leave this chanting, XXXVI: This is my prayer to thee”; “From the Fugitive: XI: Neither mother nor daughter”; “The Child”

Nissim Ezekiel “Enterprise”; “Background Casually”; “In India”; “Poet, Lover, Bird Watcher”

Kamala Das “An Introduction”; “In Love”; “Jaisurya”; “My Grandmother’s House”

Raja Rao Kanthapura

Anita Desai Where Shall We Go this Summer?

Salman Rushdie Midnight’s Children

Girish Karnad Hayavadana

 

 

COURSE NO: ENG. - 304: EPIC TRADITIONS OF THE WORLD

Background lectures on Epic Traditions: Oral and Written.

Homer Odyssey (Selected Books)

Introduction to Sanskrit epics i. The Ramayana

ii. The Mahabharata

Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf

Manipuri epic The Khamba-Thoibi

John Milton Paradise Lost (Book I)

 

FOURTH SEMESTER

COURSE NO. TITLE OF COURSE NUMBER OF CREDITS

401 American Literature – II 4

402 Postcolonial Literature 4

403 Literature in Translation: New Horizons 4

404 Literary Theory 4

 

COURSE NO: ENG.- 401: AMERICAN LITERATURE - II

Background Lectures on: Drama and Fiction.

Nathaniel Hawthorne The Scarlet Letter

Mark Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Herman Melville Moby Dick

Ernest Hemingway The Sun Also Rises

N. Scoff Momaday House Made of Dawn

Toni Morrison The Bluest Eye

Eugene O’Neil Desire Under the Elms

 

COURSE NO: ENG.- 402: POST-COLONIAL LITERATURE

Background Lectures on: Post-colonial Literature

Margaret Atwood “Progressive Insanities of a Pioneer”; “Journey to the Interior”;

“Animals in that Country”

A.D. Hope “Australia”; “The Wandering Islands”; “The Death of the Bird”;

“Imperial Adam”

Chinua Achebe “Refugee Mother and Child”; “Christmas in Biafra”; “Remembrance Day”; “Beware Soul Brother”; “Lazarus”

Dennis Brutus A Troubadour I Traverse; The Sun on this Rubble

Chinua Achebe Things Fall Apart

Ngugi wa Thiong’o The Trial of Dedan Kimathi

Patrick White Voss

V.S. Naipaul A House for Mr Biswas

Chandani Lokuge If the Moon Smiled

 

 

 

COURSE NO: 403: LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION: NEW HORIZONS

Kalidas Meghdoot

Sophocles King Oedipus

Feodor Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment

Franz Kafka The Castle

Bama Ama Karukku

Bertolt Brecht The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Pacha Meetei Imphal and Its Climatic Conditions

 

 

COURSE NO: 404: LITERARY THEORY

Liberal Humanism

Structuralism, Post-Structuralism and Deconstruction

Modernism and Post-Modernism

Post-Colonialism

Feminism

Ecocriticism

Cultural Materialism and New Historicism

 

ELECTIVE COURSES (for Students of other disciplines in the III &IV Sems.)

The following two Courses shall follow the same pattern of examination as given above and each of them shall have three credits carrying 100 marks of which 30 marks shall be for internal examination. These two Courses are given for students from other disciplines, the first Course I is for the III Semester and the second Course II is for the IV Semester.

 

COURSE I: DYNAMICS OF ENGLISH STUDIES

Shakespeare The Tempest

Ernest Hemingway The Old Man and The Sea

Hijam Anganghal Jahera

William Blake “The Tyger”

PB Shelley “Ode to the West Wind”

Robert Frost “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening”

N. Kunjamohon Singh The Taste of an Hilsa (Translated by Ch. Manihar Singh)*

Tolstoy The Three Hermits*

Munshi Premchand The Shroud*

Cyprian Ekwensi The Ivory Dancer*

* From M. Mani Meitei, ed. The Grasshopper and Other Stories. Delhi: Foundation, 2011

 

COURSE -II: COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH SKILLS (CBCS)

1. Define Phonetics and Phonology; English Phonology: vowels, consonants, semivowels, dipthongs, intonation.

2. Introduction to IPA, ICT (Information and Communication Technology), Phonetic features that affect the Intelligibility.

3. Basic Sentences in English

4. Practice in Language Use: Group discussion, Extempore and Role Play

5. Semantics: homonyms; polesemy; synonyms, antonyms, hyponymy, homograph, homophones.

Suggested Reading

1. A.C. Gimson (1980). An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English.

2. F.P. Dinnen (1967). An Introduction to General Linguistics.

3. C.F. Hockett (1963). A Course in Modern Linguistics.

4. John Lyons (1981). Language and Linguistics: An Introduction to Linguistics.

5. Victoria Fromkin and Robert Rodman (1978). An Introduction to Language.